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Navigating Financial Giving

It’s not about how much you give, but where your heart is.

A rich guy is turned away because he will not sell everything he has and give it to the poor.

A servant is chastised for not turning a few bucks into a pile of cash.

A poor widow is commended for giving a cent – all she has – into a defunct religious system.

A woman pours expensive perfume on Jesus’s feet; Judas interjects; Jesus allows.

A couple claim more generosity than is true; God kills them.

If you’re looking for a hard stop rule in the Bible to follow when it comes to following Jesus with your finances, stop now, because you’ll only get confused. Instead, here’s a principle:

When it comes to stewardship, it’s not about amounts, but awareness.

Neither your 10% gift, your Sunday offering, nor giving it all away satisfies a spiritual stewardship quota that allows you to stop discerning how the Spirit, today and every day, is leading you to love God with all your heart, mind, and strength—which includes your finances.

For more on how you are naturally inclined to love God and others with your finances, consider checking out The Seven Money Types: Discover How God Wired You to Handle Money.

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Tommy Brown

Tommy Brown is a writer, speaker, and develops strategies that support financial development. He and his wife Elizabeth live in Winston-Salem, NC along with their children Seri and Seth. He served in leadership at two churches as an ordained minister from 2001-2014, leading congregations into financial wellbeing and a holistic approach to integrating faith and finances. Tommy has a B.A. in Pastoral Ministry and Masters degrees in Divinity and Management. His entrepreneurial endeavors over the years have extended into real estate development and church consulting on stewardship matters. Now, Thomas works alongside an award-winning team of storytellers at Wake Forest University, performing strategic planning and project development for initiatives that fund the university¹s $1,000,000,000 capital campaign. Thomas was instrumental in forming Wake Forest University's financial wellbeing initiative. He has a heart for seeing churches, students, and people of faith form connections between faith and finances.

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